FRIDA Call for Proposals: Meaningful Teenage Girl and LGBTQA Youth Engagement

Call for Proposals – Internal Policies and Procedures for Meaningful Teenage Girl and LGBTQA Youth Engagement

Location: Flexible

Duration: 3 month contract

Application Deadline – July 7, 2019

Application here

ABOUT FRIDA

Founded in 2010, FRIDA | The Young Feminist Fund is the only youth-led fund focused exclusively on supporting young feminist activism to advance social justice movements and agendas across the globe. We believe in thecollective power, expertise, and innovation of young feminist organizers to address root causes and structures of inequality in order to create lasting change in their communities. To this end, FRIDA:

  • Provides small flexible grants to fund initiatives led by girls, young women, trans* and intersex youth under 30 years old with small flexible grants for core support, selected through an annual participatory review process.

  • Offers opportunities for capacity development that are accessible and responsive to the needs of young feminist organizers, and based on linking and learning relationships that strengthen networks of young feminist activists within multigenerational movements;

  • Mobilizes resources from both traditional and non-traditional sources, with new and modern methods, to enhance the quality and quantity of funding for women’s human rights; and

  • Builds knowledge for advocacy to ensure financial and non-financial policies are inclusive and responsive to the priorities articulated by girls, young women, trans* and intersex youth.

POSITION BACKGROUND

Since the very first grantmaking cycle, FRIDA has been funding and supporting young feminist groups led by  or centered on teenage girl groups representing different identities and backgrounds. Overall FRIDA funded and supported around 95 girl-led, teenage LGBTQA or girls-centered groups.

At FRIDA we believe in the transforming power of girls and LGBTQA youth activists to fully participate in social justice movements. FRIDA promotes meaningful teenage girl and LGBTQA engagement in its governance and it ensures a representation of girl and LGBTQA expertise in the Advisory Committee. Advisors represented by teenage girls and LGBTQA youth bring their expertise and  perspectives to shape FRIDA’s support to girl led, LGBTQA youth and girl focused groups. They play a key role in advising on girl, LGBTQA issues, supporting with specific outreach in each region, participate in projects and represent FRIDA at advocacy and philanthropy events.

FRIDA is requesting proposals for a consultant who would support in reviewing existing meaningful teenage girl and LGBTQA engagement practices at FRIDA, especially from legal standpoints for safeguarding and recommend what gaps needs to be addressed.

MAIN ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Work closely with key staff members girl advisors, grantee partners and board members address any institutional risks, particularly safeguarding and other legal gaps. This will include development of relevant policies, protocols that might include child protection, ethical and labour code working with activists under 18 years old

  • Document and improve existing strategies and approaches to girl engagement, child participation, and child protection

  • Potentially develop girl and queer friendly information that is accessible and relevant to their contexts

  • Organize and deliver online webinars and if needed in-person trainings for FRIDA staff and FRIDA community

  • Advise on legal aspects of meaningful participation of activists under 18 years old in FRIDA’s governance, including Board, Advisory Committee

  • Advise on FRIDA’s grantmaking and document the actual legal process of awarding grants, transferring funds, and providing tailored support to girl-led groups.

  • Advise on FRIDA’s monitoring and evaluation, capacity building, advocacy when it comes to supporting teenage girls and LGBTQA youth participation.

KEY DELIVERABLES

1. An organizational audit of current policies and standards at FRIDA

2. Based on the audit, 2-3 most significant or urgent policies (new or revised) for work with teenage girls and LGBTIQ youth, these could include:

  • Ethical standards for working with minors
  • A whistleblower policy
  • A child protection policy
  • Safeguarding policy
  • Protocol related to labour laws re: to adolescents and how payment regulations look like for activists under 18

3. Train staff, advisors, board and wider FRIDA community in do no harm approaches (child protection policies etc)

REQUIRED SKILLS & QUALIFICATIONS 

  • The ideal candidate will have experience in the development of child rights policies and guidelines working with activists under 18 years old.
  • Knowledge of international and regional child protection mechanisms and guidelines working with activists under 18 years old.

  • Experience in engaging /  being part of girl-led groups or building girl-adult partnerships.

  • Proficiency in Microsoft Office, familiarity with databases, information management systems and ability to maintain well organized and documented files.

  • Good interpersonal skills, with ability to network,  liaise in a multicultural environment; and work remotely.

  • Demonstrated commitment to supporting young feminist-led organizing, girls, women’s and LGBTQAI+ rights, youth issues.

  • Knowledge of community training, evaluation and documentation

  • Fluency in reading and writing in English.

DESIRABLE SKILLS & QUALIFICATIONS 

  • Knowledge of Canadian laws (where FRIDA is legally registered) to ensure compliance and consistency of developed procedures

  • Experience in the Global South, at least in one of the five regions where FRIDA operates

  • Experience in building and maintaining participatory, inclusive and meaningful engagement with girl activists, groups and their communities, including parents.

  • Fluency in any of the following languages* (i.e. French, Arabic and Mandarin, Russian, Spanish and Portuguese are desirable).

INITIAL BUDGET AND COMPENSATION

FRIDA has budgeted approximately 2000 USD for a three-month consultancy, but envisions that this could be a multi-phase project with additional budget. We appreciate hearing from the proposals’ thoughts on this.

HOW TO APPLY

Please submit your application on BambooHR. Link shared on FRIDA website.

1) Please send your Proposal, including estimated costs and timeline

2) Resume or CV

3) Two references

To learn more about FRIDA, please visit our website at http://youngfeministfund.org/.

To apply, please visit this website.

FRIDA encourages, promotes and supports diversity in all aspects of its work. Young women and trans youth under the age of 30 from the Global South are strongly encouraged to apply.

Listening to Black Women and Girls

Listening to Black Women and Girls: Lived Experiences of Adultification Bias

By JAMILIA J. BLAKE, PH.D. and REBECCA EPSTEIN, J.D.

In June 2017, the Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality released Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood, a report that presented the findings from our quantitative analysis of a form of gendered racial bias against Black girls: adultification.

This bias is a stereotype in which adults view Black girls as less innocent and more adult-like than their white peers, devoid of any individualized context. In other words, adultification bias is not an evaluation of maturity based on observation of an individual girl’s behavior, but instead is a presumption — a typology applied generally to Black girls.

Help end adultification by sharing your own story here.

Watch a video on the subject here.

Read more at The Georgetown Law Center.

One woman’s story shows how systems are failing black girls

For the first time in a long time, C’alra Bradley felt a glint of hope.

It was an unfamiliar feeling for the then-18-year-old whose life had been disrupted and derailed by one roadblock after another. Once an A and B student who loved to read, she was living out of her white 1997 Toyota Avalon, on her own for three years, scrounging to get by.

But on July 18, 2016, as she attended one of her first classes at a GED and job training program in Houston, C’alra finally believed things were about to change.

She beamed as a career coach outlined the course ahead: the stipend for good attendance, the training on construction builds, the high school diploma at the end. C’alra (whose name is pronounced See-er-uh) could almost clasp the glimmer of a better life.

Then, with the coach’s next words, the vision evaporated: The students needed to wear work pants and closed-toe shoes for job sites.

A shadow flicked across C’alra’s face. The dress and flip-flops she wore were the only clothes she had. She had no money. No idea what to do.

Read more at USA Today.

Monique Morris: Why Are Black Girls More Likely To Be Punished In School?

About Monique Morris’s TED Talk

Black girls are disproportionately punished more often in schools. Monique Morris says schools should be a place for healing rather than punishment to help black girls reach their full potential.

Learn more at NPR

Got Consent Takeover by A Long Walk Home

A message from A Long Walk Home:

We would like to thank all of our participants for joining us for Got Consent Takeover by standing in solidarity with Black girls and survivors everywhere as R Kelly made his first appearance in court for sexual abuse charges on March 22. We will continue to put survivors first and fight for justice as the trial continues, and as Black girls and women continue to share their stories. Here is a snapshot of some of our A Long Walk Home family, friends, and allies, as they stand in solidarity with Black girls & survivors!

Check out photos from the takeover below:

You Know Madeleine McCann. These Missing Girls Of Color Are Cold Cases, Too.

Three-year-old Madeleine McCann disappeared on May 3, 2007 from a holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Portugal. Her story became an international sensation. What had become of the angelic, little, blonde British girl? Had she been murdered by her parents? Abducted and sold into a pedophilia ring?

It’s been 10 year’s and Madeleine’s story still captures headlines. In March 2019, she was the subject of the Australian podcast Maddie, and a Netflix series called The Disappearance of Madeline McCann. So why do we remain captivated by the fate of this specific little girl, especially when so many other children go missing every day? The answer might have something to do with a phenomenon coined “missing white woman syndrome” by journalist Gwen Ifill to refer to the media’s obsession with covering the cases of missing and endangered white women like Natalee Holloway, Elizabeth Smart, and Mollie Tibbetts.

While every missing person deserves attention, not all cases are treated equally in the media. In particular, there seems to be little interest in missing persons of color – even children as young at Madeleine. Zach Sommers, a law and science fellow at Northwestern University School of Law undertook a study to empirically prove the largely anecdotal theory that women of color receive different treatment from the media. He found distinct disparities in race and gender in both how often the media covered missing women of color, and in the intensity of that coverage once it did appear in the news, with the numbers overwhelmingly favoring white women and girls.

Read more at Refinery 29

Naomi Wadler Continues Her Activism for Black Girls One Year After Walkouts

Young activist Naomi Wadler’s fight for Black girls didn’t end after the March for our Lives

“Black women [are] really what I like to focus on because we’re not really seen as women. We’re seen as things,” she stated. “I love treating people like people.”

Wadler, whose speech and activism made waves after the school shooting in Parkland says the attack really accentuated her point about gun violence and people of color.

“When you have mass shootings in Chicago you don’t really see that getting all this attention,” she explained. “But when Parkland, which happened to some white kids, that’s suddenly the biggest thing that’s ever happened to us and that’s unacceptable.”

Since staging her elementary school’s gun violence walkout, Wadler was a guest on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” made Teen Vogue’s 21 Under 21 list, and spoke at events like the Women in the World Annual Summit. She works with multiple organizations, including holding a seat on the board of Georgetown Law’s Initiative on Gender, Justice, and Opportunity.

Learn more at Now This News

What We Risk When We Fail to Protect Black Girls

Last month, the Lifetime docuseries Surviving R. Kelly elevated the claims against the R&B singer as a serial abuser of women and girls. Kelly was charged in Illinois on Friday with ten counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse.

But what also became apparent from the docuseries was the number of adults—from Kelly’s manager to parents of the minors he is believed to have violated—who were complicit in his systematic abuse of underage Black girls. Beyond the pain his alleged victims suffered, the docuseries highlighted that these girls were not afforded the protection they deserve as children, much like Black girls at large.

Such disregard for Black girls and women’s safety has public health consequences. Notably, emerging research implicates this systematic lack of protection in the disproportionately high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among Black girls and women. This was also evident in the docuseries: One woman said she acquired an STI from Kelly.

Read more at Rewire News

The Legal System Has Failed Black Girls, Women, and Non-Binary Survivors of Violence

Following the airing of Lifetime’s six-part docuseries, “Surviving R. Kelly,” — which describes decades of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse he allegedly perpetrated against Black girls and women — many of Kelly’s fans and supporters continue to rally around the singer-songwriter and even place blame on his accusers for being “fast.”

This is not surprising. Studies have shown that Black girls, women, and non-binary people are hyper-vulnerable to abuse. About 22 percent of Black women in the United States have experienced rape. Forty percent will experience intimate partner violence in their lifetime. And Black women are killed at a higher rate than any other group of women. A 2015 survey of Black trans and non-binary individuals found that 53 percent have experienced sexual violence, and 56 percent have experienced domestic violence. At least 16 Black trans people were reportedly murdered in 2018 alone.

Read more at the ACLU

4 Black Middle School Girls Allegedly Strip-Searched At New York State School

A community in New York state is loudly protesting after four Black girls, under suspicion of having drugs, were allegedly questioned and strip-searched by the school nurse and assistant principal at East Middle School in Binghamton.

According to the Binghamton Press and Sun-Bulletin, almost 200 community members packed into a school board meeting, demanding why the board had taken no action in response to the alleged searches that apparently occurred after the girls, who are Black, appeared “hyper and giddy during their lunch hour.”

“The children were instructed to remove their clothing, and felt shamed, humiliated and traumatized by the experience,” said Progressive Leaders of Tomorrow, a local organization in the area.

The school said that they investigated the incident, citing the current law and policy which allows students to be searched in a school building by an administrator “when the administrator reasonably suspects that a student’s health is in danger or is in possession of a substance that may harm themselves or others.”

Read more at Essence.