Asian American Girls Can Have ADHD Too

You can tell I’m an Asian-American woman by looking at me. What’s not so obvious is my ADHD; even I didn’t know about it until this year because, in our American society, people who look like me are not “supposed” to have attention deficit disorder (ADHD or ADD).

I was not “supposed” to have ADHD as a girl; the ADHD stereotypemaintains that only boys who misbehave have ADHD. My elementary school teachers saw a shy girl who listened to directions. What they didn’t see was that I was trying so hard to keep track of what my teacher and classmates were saying in class that I didn’t have time to consider speaking up, so I defaulted to not talking at all. But at recess, I was so energetic and talkative that my friends often called me “hyper,” which I was.

Read more at AADitude Magazine

56 indigenous Washington women missing, new reports finds

The Seattle City Council on Wednesday heard testimony on missing and murdered indigenous women and girls.

The hearing came on the heels of months of controversy across the U.S. and Canada about failed data collection when it comes to these missing persons cases and murder investigations. On Tuesday, the Washington State Patrol released a 36-page report outlining its findings into missing girls and women.

The State Patrol found 56 women from Washington are missing, 12 from King County. Studies from across the U.S. and Canada put that figure into the thousands.

Seattle City Councilmember Debora Juarez called for the committee hearing to better understand data collection and to find out what political leaders and police can do to help.

Read more in KOMO News

Human trafficking largely targets Indigenous women and girls: MMIWG report

The daughter of a residential school survivor, she was placed into care at seven months, then at four adopted into a middle-class white household where she reckoned with racism and abuse.

“I was always being made aware of the colour of my skin and that it was a bad thing,” Wallace-Littlechief recalls. After standing up for herself at the age of 13, she was moved into a group home, where she was called Apple — “white on the inside and brown on the outside,” she says. She never felt accepted.

Wallace-Littlechief eventually ran away from the home. Within half an hour, she was drugged and raped, she said.

“I ended up in this home where they’re injecting me with drugs and fixing my hair and telling me how beautiful l am. They were grooming me and I soaked it up,” she said. “ I considered it love — that was the only love that I had ever experienced. They cared for me and I felt so privileged that these adults were wanting to be my friend and look after me.”

By the age of 14, she was working on the streets.

Read more at The Star Phoenix.

Why so many Latina teens in Philly have attempted suicide

A new report sheds light on a startling finding: Latina girls in Philadelphia are more likely than white or African-American girls to attempt suicide. One in seven has attempted suicide and one in five has seriously considered it. Why is this happening and why hasn’t this fact made its way into mainstream discourse about mental health?

Philadelphia Inquirer reporter Aneri Pattani explains on this episode of The Why.

Listening to Black Women and Girls

Listening to Black Women and Girls: Lived Experiences of Adultification Bias

By JAMILIA J. BLAKE, PH.D. and REBECCA EPSTEIN, J.D.

In June 2017, the Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality released Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood, a report that presented the findings from our quantitative analysis of a form of gendered racial bias against Black girls: adultification.

This bias is a stereotype in which adults view Black girls as less innocent and more adult-like than their white peers, devoid of any individualized context. In other words, adultification bias is not an evaluation of maturity based on observation of an individual girl’s behavior, but instead is a presumption — a typology applied generally to Black girls.

Help end adultification by sharing your own story here.

Watch a video on the subject here.

Read more at The Georgetown Law Center.

A new report shows how racism and bias deny black girls their childhoods

It’s long been suspected that black girls are perceived as more adult-like and less innocent than white girls in school and other environments, and a new report offers further confirmation that this is the case.

Researchers with the Initiative on Gender Justice and Opportunity at Georgetown Law’s Center on Poverty and Inequality spoke directly to black girls and women across the country about how they are forced to deal with harmful perceptions — like that black girls are more mature and less in need of protection than other students — from a young age.

This phenomenon, which the researchers refer to as “adultification bias,” was examined in a 2017 report from the same team. The latest report builds on those findings by including the lived experiences of black women and girls. It’s also worth noting that many of the women cited in the report recalled dealing with the same sorts of issues in their childhoods, showing that this is far from a new problem.

Read more at Vox. 

One woman’s story shows how systems are failing black girls

For the first time in a long time, C’alra Bradley felt a glint of hope.

It was an unfamiliar feeling for the then-18-year-old whose life had been disrupted and derailed by one roadblock after another. Once an A and B student who loved to read, she was living out of her white 1997 Toyota Avalon, on her own for three years, scrounging to get by.

But on July 18, 2016, as she attended one of her first classes at a GED and job training program in Houston, C’alra finally believed things were about to change.

She beamed as a career coach outlined the course ahead: the stipend for good attendance, the training on construction builds, the high school diploma at the end. C’alra (whose name is pronounced See-er-uh) could almost clasp the glimmer of a better life.

Then, with the coach’s next words, the vision evaporated: The students needed to wear work pants and closed-toe shoes for job sites.

A shadow flicked across C’alra’s face. The dress and flip-flops she wore were the only clothes she had. She had no money. No idea what to do.

Read more at USA Today.

One in 7 Latina girls in Philadelphia has attempted suicide, yet their struggles often remain invisible

Every morning when Noelia Rivera-Calderón got to high school, she’d run to the bathroom to throw up.

The first few times, the school nurse suggested she go home. But after that, the staff acted as if it were normal for her to be sick.

Every morning when Noelia Rivera-Calderón got to high school, she’d run to the bathroom to throw up.

The first few times, the school nurse suggested she go home. But after that, the staff acted as if it were normal for her to be sick.

Today, Rivera-Calderón is fighting for girls like her to be seen. She recently led a report from the National Women’s Law Center about the mental health of Latina students in Philadelphia, titled “We Are Not Invisible.”

Read more at the Philadelphia Inquirer. 

Philly’s Latinx girls need more mental health support

Growing up in North Philadelphia in a Latino household, we never talked about mental health. But I knew something was off when, at age 15, I stopped wanting to go to school and was feeling depressed. Like many kids, I turned to my mom first — telling her I wanted to talk to somebody. But the Latino community faces a lot of stigmas when it comes to our mental health.

As a community, only 20 percent of us who have symptoms of a psychological disorder will talk to a doctor about our concerns and, even worse, only 10 percent of Latinos will contact a mental-health specialist, according to the National Alliance on Mental Health. That’s why it should come as no surprise that my mom’s response was, “you’re just having a bad day. I have bad days, too.” But I wasn’t just having a bad day. Soon enough, I was skipping school on a regular basis and feeling sad all the time.

Read more at the Philadelphia Inquirer 

A Long Walk Home at CREA Reconference

A Long Walk Home was the only group selected from the United States to present in Kathmandu, Nepal at the CREA Reconference: Rethink, Reimagine, Reboot April 10-12. From the support of With and For Girls, an international collective of funders (EMpower, Mama Cash, Nike Foundation, NoVo Foundation, Plan UK, Stars Foundation, The Global Fund for Children and The Malala Fund) Girl/Friends will join other young girl activists from Mexico, Indonesia, Haiti, Turkey, Egypt, Russia, and many more to reimagine change and transformation and reboot a movement.

Learn more about A Long Walk Home here. 

Learn more about CREA Reconference here.