Muslims grapple with Supreme Court ruling that they believe redefines their place in America

Ramy Almansoob’s children have been asking every day for weeks: “Do we have a decision yet? Do we have a decision yet? Do we have a decision yet?”

The girls, ages 6, 9 and 13, still live in the war-torn capital of Yemen, where the seeming randomness of airstrikes has taught them to brace for a painful end. Last year, they mourned their grandmother, killed by a stray bullet through the head as she sat inside her home.

The girls knew that the U.S. Supreme Court would soon decide whether President Trump’s ban on entry into the United States by citizens of seven countries, five of them majority-Muslim, including Yemen, would stand. They knew that the ruling would determine whether they and their mother — whose visas were granted on the eve of the ban and then revoked — could finally join their father, a U.S. citizen, in America.

Tuesday’s Supreme Court ruling felt like a hammer’s final blow to Almansoob’s lingering hopes. For him and the thousands of other American citizens and permanent residents who have been waiting anxiously for the court’s word, the justices’ decision to uphold the ban presented a verdict not just on the fate of their families, but also on what it means to be American.

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