Sally Nuamah on how punishment against black girls impacts our democracy

As an undergraduate student at George Washington University, Sally Nuamah studied abroad in Ghana and observed the numerous barriers to achievement girls faced as they attended schools designed without them in mind.

This experience sparked her interest in researching black women and girls’ education and led her to create a documentary on the lives of girls in Ghana. Nuamah founded an organization, the TWII Foundation, that has supported around 30 girls with the resources they need to achieve. In fact, the screenings from her documentary raised money to send the three girls in the film to college.

Her scholarship centers on black women and girls and education, and she has received national attention for it. During her one year as an assistant professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy, Nuamah was named to the Forbes 30 under 30 in education, a Chron15 pioneer and a 2019 Andrew Carnegie Fellow. Now, she’ll be pursuing her studies as an assistant professor at the Northwestern University School of Education and Social Policy.

Read more at The Chronicle.