The 2013-2014 data also shows that black girls were four times more likely to be arrested at school than white girls.

A new report is further confirming the racial biases black girls face in school when it comes to being disciplined.

The National Black Women’s Justice Institute recently examined the Education Department’s data from the 2013-2014 school year, which was released in June 2016, and found that nationally, black girls were more than seven times more likely than white girls to receive an out-of-school suspension.

Though black girls made up only 16 percent of the female student population, 28 percent of them were physically restrained, 43 percent were referred to law enforcement (2.5 times more likely than white girls) and 38 percent were arrested (four times more likely than white girls). Latina elementary students were nearly three times more likely to be arrested than non-Latina white girls.

The social justice nonprofit also looked at these trends regionally. In the South and the West, black girls were five times more likely to face suspension than white girls; in the northeast, black girls were six times more likely to face suspension; and in the Midwest, black girls were 10 times more likely.

Read the full article in the Huffington Post.

Download the National Black Women’s Justice Institute’s full report.